Eline Chivot

Eline Chivot

SENIOR POLICY ANALYST, CENTER FOR DATA INNOVATION

Eline Chivot is a senior policy analyst at the Center for Data Innovation. Based in Brussels, Eline focuses on European technology policy issues and on how policymakers can promote digital innovation in the EU. Prior to joining the Center for Data Innovation, Eline worked as a policy analyst at the Hague Center for Strategic Studies (HCSS), where her work included research projects on defence, security, and economic policy issues. More recently, Eline worked at one of Brussels’ largest trade associations, DigitalEurope, and managed its relations with representatives of the digital tech industry in Europe and beyond. Eline earned master’s degrees in political science and economics from Sciences Po Lille, and in strategic management and business administration from the University of Lille.

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our speakers

Wednesday 07 October

  • 5G: MEDICINE FOR POST-CORONA RECOVERY?

    • Anthony Whelan
    • Eline Chivot
    • Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar
    • Joyce Hakmeh
    • Lise Fuhr
    • Ulf Pehrsson

    While COVID-19 has caused delays in 5G implementation, the crisis also underscored the importance of its swift and effective deployment. Business leaders and scientists from the G20 member states have voiced the urgent need to improve digital infrastructure in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting that 5G is key to future economic recovery. How can policymakers overcome procedural roadblocks and resistant stakeholders and allow 5G to play a significant role in the post-pandemic recovery?

    Habsburg
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    Grand Hotel River Park
    Live broadcast

Thursday 08 October

  • DIGITAL SOVEREIGNTY & THE SCRAMBLE FOR DATA SUPREMACY

    • Anett Numa
    • Cameron F. Kerry
    • Carl Benedikt Frey
    • Eline Chivot
    • Henri Verdier
    • Lucinda Creighton

    Our personal data is being mined for economic gain by private companies, which raises questions about who owns it and what they can do with it. Simultaneously, data is increasingly being viewed as a resource for states seeking an economic and strategic advantage over their rivals. German Chancellor Angela Merkel recently asserted that it is time for Europe to wrestle control of European data from their US and Asian counterparts. German Minister, Peter Altmaier, is spearheading GAIA-X as a way to counterbalance what he views as strategic and economic advantages derived from Chinese and US companies owning the most considerable portion of cloud services in the world. As data enters the great power competition domain, how can we balance a state’s legitimate economic and security concerns without sacrificing the free flow of cross-border data channels? What impact will the new scramble for data have on existing trade and geo-economic conflicts? Should Europe’s ambitions go beyond data sovereignty towards AI sovereignty*?

    * AI sovereignty = access to the most advanced AI-enabling technologies and data on a global level, applied according to European rules and values, without being dependent on foreign actors

    Habsburg
    -


    Grand Hotel River Park
    Live broadcast